This all came to me while reading Loren McDonald’s post, ‘EmailGeekonomics’: Time For Some New Email Metrics yesterday.  I know. That seems like a total disconnect to “The Sexy Side of Email Marketing”, but don’t worry; it’s not.  The Glee references will help it all make sense.  Really…. in some twisted way it all makes sense….

There are some that think that email itself just isn’t sexy, but I disagree.  And in the same way that Right Said Fred brought sexy to music videos, Loren points out the sexy side of email with his latest post.

 

 

I’m sure many people in the email space think that the sexy part of email is how it looks and/or sounds (or reads – work with me, here.  I’m trying to make a point).  Do the cool graphics or video in an email make it sexy?  Is it the content?  You know, “sell the sizzle” and all that? 

But ask an email geek what’s sexy about email and if they’re a true geek they’re going to turn to the data.  Building cool stuff on cool tools is more fun than it is sexy, not that sexy can’t be fun.  That may impress ourselves or our peers, but our bosses could really give a rat’s ass – until you can put the numbers behind it and are able to tell them what those numbers mean.  

A low open/render rate with moderate clicks and a high conversion might indicate a weak subject line, a luke-warm value proposition and/or call to action, yet with a strong landing page.  Or a high number of clickthroughs with a low conversion might be indicative of a crappy landing page.   All things that can be gleaned from basic email metrics depending on how you apply them.  Applications of metrics in those instances will help you to fine tune your messaging, which in turn should make more money.  

It’s the data that tells you if the sexy fluffy words and pretty pictures (or videos) are doing their job when you properly apply it.  Did you know that email messaging has a measurable impact on other areas of a business, like call centers and even payment processing?  Do you know how to apply your data to measure it?  Do you think if you did you’d be able to provide greater context of “email’s” value to the C-Suite and marketing department as Loren said? 

Don’t be intimidated by the fluffy words and pretty pictures crowd in the marketing department.  We have all felt the cold humiliation of a slushie in the face.

 

Don’t be intimidated by your data; embrace it; apply it.  Knowing the numbers, what they mean, and how to use them – that’s the sexy side of email.